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Sunday, 19 January 2014 03:34

H22A Build

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This JDM H22A started out as a simple rebuild that Randall bought not running and had no compression on one cylinder.  After changing out computers and getting it running, I pulled the head to see just how bad the damage was.  I found that someone had screwed up a previous rebuild and broke the piston rings; this of course marred the cylinder walls.  Upon further breakdown, I found thread marks on the rod journals from putting the pistons in with no protection on the rod bolts, the thrust washers put in backwards, as well as missing clutch bolts and bellhousing bolts.  I started stripping the block for boring, and found that the balance shafts had bad bearings and were scarred as well.  This called for a major build, so off to the machine shop it went for a work-over.

The final result:  cylinders bored 40 over, new pistons, machined crank, new bearings, custom balance shaft delete kit, and a ton of minor peices. Randall also chose to add a firenza lightweight flywheel and exedy stage 1 clutch to the package. It was a much bigger bill than originally anticipated, but well worth the money especially since this car is already sitting on nice coil overs, 17" wheels, has the type R interior and halo projector headlights! He even lucked out with no grinds from the tranny and the AC works.  Needless to say, it was a lot of fun to build, but even more fun to drive.

The shaft delete kit that I put together was inspired by 2point2 on hondatech.com.  It includes a 40mm freeze plug (front shaft hole in oil pump), (2) 21mm freeze plugs (inside and outside of rear shaft hole), (3) 10mm x 16mm m6 solid dowels, 12mm x 20 mm m6 solid dowel (main cap dowel replacements), short sheet metal screw (for center bearing on rear shaft), and (3) 8mm x 1.25 bolts. I chose to put a screw in the bearing hole rather than drill, tap, set screw from the bottom end partly because I didn't want to do all that way down in a hole, partly to try something nobody else had.  It worked either way, but I'm not going to say it was easy.

Read 95742 times Last modified on Sunday, 19 January 2014 03:48
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